Learning Activity 4-C-3

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Learning Activity 4-C-3 Wiki Instructions


To add your lesson plan:

  1. Click the Edit tab in the upper-right corner.
  2. Scroll down the page until you see the first empty lesson plan space.
  3. Highlight the "Your Name" text.
  4. Type your name.
  5. Highlight the "Enter Lesson Plan here." text.
  6. Type or copy and paste your lesson plan..
  7. Press Save on the Editor bar.

To comment on a classmate's lesson plan:

  1. Click on the Discussion tab in the upper-right corner (next to Edit).
  2. Click the New Post button.
  3. In the Subject field, enter the name of your classmate followed by "Lesson Plan Feedback" (ex. Laura's Lesson Plan Feedback).
  4. In the Message field, type in your feedback.
  5. Click Post.


Lori Wall's Lesson Plan


Grade level: 8

Subject: Math (Algebra 1, Pre-Algebra)

Topic: Solving multi-step equations.

Teacher materials needed:
  1. Textbook
  2. Smartboard for notes
  3. blog with multi-step questions posted,

Student materials needed:
  1. Textbook
  2. notebook

Time required: one class

Objectives:
  1. To solve multi step equations.
  2. To explain/justify multi step equations

Standards: Common Core State Standards
  1. A.CED.1
  2. A.REI.1
  3. A.REI.3

Preparation:
  1. Have example equations saved in notes using Smartboard.
  2. Have equations saved and ready to post to blog (along with completed notes).

Procedure:
  1. Review: review inverse operations. Multiplication and division are inverse operations. Addition and subtraction are inverse operations. When the coefficient is a fraction the inverse operation is to multiply by the reciprocal.
  2. Review: review solving one and two step equations (keep the scale balanced). First undo or use the inverse operation for add/subtract then undo or use the inverse operation for multiply/divide.
  3. Introduce new lesson: When solving an equation with more than 2 steps first simplify both sides of the equal sign (no inverse operations are used yet). Once both sides contain no more than one variable term and one constant term then inverse operations are needed to solve the equation.
  4. Examples on Smartboard.
  5. Have students explain and justify steps when examples are solved.
  6. Examples including application or word problems.
  7. Save Smartboard notes and post to blog for students to have for reference (along with their notes).
  8. Exit ticket: have student solve and explain a multi-step equation.

Assessment & Evaluation:
  1. Have students answer and explain/justify their solutions to 3 questions from the teachers blog.
  2. The questions and their solutions will be posted to their individual student blog.
  3. Solutions may be in number/word form or solved using a screenshot along with the written explanation.
  4. Blog entries are due in 2 days.
    1. Some students may have difficulty (or lack computer) accessing blog at home and need more time at school to finish (i.e. during a study hall, afterschool tutoring)

Blog questions:
  1. The height (in feet) of a tree after x years is 1.5x + 15. After how many years is the tree 24 feet tall? Hint: Draw a diagram, create equation, solve.
  2. A postcard is 4 inches in length, and the width allows for 3 inches for the address and b inches for the message. The area of the postcard is 24 square inches. What is the width b of the message (in inches)? Hint: Draw a diagram, create equation, solve.
  3. You order 2 servings of pancakes and a fruit cup. The cost of the fruit cup is $1.50. You leave a 15% tip. Your total bill is $11.50. How much does one serving of pancakes cost?

Rubric:

3 points
2 points
1 point
0 pts
Q - 1
correct answer
detailed & correct
explanation
correct answer
vague explanation
or minor errors
incorrect answer
attempted or incorrect
explanation
did not do
Q - 2
correct answer
detailed & correct
explanation
correct answer
vague explanation
or minor errors
incorrect answer
attempted or incorrect
explanation
did not do
Q - 3
correct answer
detailed & correct
explanation
correct answer
vague explanation
or minor errors
incorrect answer
attempted or incorrect
explanation
did not do


M Ruch's Lesson Plan

Title: Ruch’s Literature Circle Blogs

Objective: Students will read, discuss, analyze and write about a chosen novel in a literature circle blog.
Grade Level: 11th-12th Grade English course, Money, Power and Social Justice
Materials: chosen novels, laptop computer cart, paper
Note: This lesson will conducted after the students have already chosen their novels for the literature circle, met once to plan a reading schedule and completed some pre-reading activities.
Procedures:
  1. I will begin the class by reading the following directions from a class handout:
    1. Directions: Literature circle assignments will encompass about 18-35 pages a day depending on the novel chosen.
    2. We will meet a total of six or seven times over the next three weeks.
    3. I strongly suggest that with each session, you use the information discussed/collected as support for your essay.
    4. As it stands now, groups will meet twice a week for half of the period (Tuesdays and Fridays). At the end of each session, you will be responsible for uploading the information you reviewed on your group’s blog site. This can be a blog you create as a group through Edublogs or Wordpress. I will provide hands on assistance when we set up the blogs. One person in the group should be the site administrator but everyone should post their own information.
    5. Overview of Lit. Circle Roles
      1. Revolving Roles: The information discussed and posted each session should be conducted in a revolving fashion. In other words, your role is not about a title, but about the information you need to bring that day. Roles will also be based on the number of people in your group and everyone must take a role at least once.
      2. GRADING: You will be assessed each session with the basic idea that you are both prepared and participating or you are not prepared. There is no in-between. You will have the opportunity to make up the grade in the event of an absence. 10 points for each session.
      3. Must be completed and uploaded each session:
        1. Section summary. One or two people can assume this role.
        2. Discussion questions. One or two people can assume this role. You should come to the meeting with at least five "thinking" questions to ask in case the conversation slows down. These "thinking" questions should be designed to get people in your group thinking about issues and topics in your reading. They should not be "recall" questions that ask for facts from the book.
        3. Themes/thesis development. For this role, you will need to locate and define the theme(s) of the reading for that session. You will then need to craft topics or thesis statements that could arise from the reading. Your group members will need to provide support for these themes.
        4. Quotations. Your task is to find and write down three to five lines or short quotations, properly cited that you think are examples of good writing or that are key or important to the story. (*Think metaphor, simile, alliteration, foreshadowing, allusion or symbolism.) Ask questions about how or why these lines/passages are so significant. Push your group to explore these ideas by delving beyond the facts of the passage. It is strongly recommended that you work with the person in charge of # 2, to align your themes with specific quotations.
        5. Historical connections/current events. For this role, you will need to search for connections between the reading material and something outside the text, such as the history behind the subject or a connection to a current event. Provide a hard copy of your information. Primary source must come from a college/university website or a newspaper article.
        6. Invading Other Literature Circles: Over the course of the next few weeks, you will need to read your fellow classmates literature circle blogs and comment on at least two of them. When you have completed this assignment, email the link with your comment directly to me.
        7. Final Discussion/Class Sharing: On the final day of your literature circle, you will need to develop an informal presentation about your novel. This will be explained in class. It will be required to use your group’s blog and retrieve the best information for your presentation.
        8. Once each group has completed their assignment, I will end the class with input from each group. I will ask one student from each group to share the best information from their discussion today. Each session, a different student will complete this task.
        9. I will end the assignment description by allowing students to get together into their groups and create their blog site. They will be required to send me a link, which I will connect via RSS feed to my own site.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the attached rubric. This will be explained to them at the third meeting.

Gayle Olson's Lesson Plan

Student Blog Lesson Plan

Background:
I am in the process of creating an online course called “Creating Citizens”. It is targeted to teachers who want or need to incorporate civic education into their work with students. Participants in a similar face to face course have included social studies teachers in grades 2-12, elementary classroom teachers, guidance counselors, teachers of talented and gifted students, special ed teachers, at risk coordinators, student council sponsors and others. One of the major purposes of the course is to acquaint the teachers with a wide variety of free online teaching resources that have been developed as part of a federal project called “Representative Democracy in America” by the Center on Congress at Indiana University, the National Conference of State Legislatures and the Center for Civic Education. The resources range from a series of 30 second sound and video files that introduce a brief fact on Congress to a very involved “Virtual Congress” that is a virtual world of Capitol Hill in Washington DC where teachers decide how they want their class to “populate” and use it.

Teachers are asked in preparation for the course to select a unit or lesson they want to revamp or create: a new one, one the students or teacher find boring, one that needs to be updated, etc. During the class, the teachers are given a grid listing the resources by grade level. They then have a bit over an hour to explore those resources, specifically looking for resources to incorporate into the unit/lesson they identified. Then each teacher has about 5-10 minutes to give a brief review on one of the resources they found to use for that unit, how to find it, how they intend to use it and why they selected it. This is always the most effective part of the course (peer to peer teaching). It is the activity that I would like to use a student blog to accomplish in the online version of the course.

Course: Creating Citizens
Unit: Resource Exploration

Objectives for this unit:
Participants will be able to:
  1. Navigate online to identify Representative Democracy in America (RDA) teaching resources appropriate to their lesson, their students and their student achievement goals
  2. Describe how they will integrate one or more of the teaching resources into their own lesson plan

Unit Introduction/“Hook”:
Class participants will each select one of their own classroom lessons that needs to be created, revamped to be more engaging or less boring. The lesson may be in a content area related to civics, reading in the content area or any other aspect of school related to civic behavior (Classroom management, afterschool, student organization, etc.) Each will make a forum post explaining their choice, why they selected it and how to align it with the Iowa Core and/or school improvement plan. They need to analyze it, to begin to consider ways of making it more active and engaged learning and how to address not only civic knowledge, but also skills and dispositions. As they begin to explore the various resources, they will look at them with a focused eye, through the lens of this specific project (creation/revision of the lesson plan) instead of random explorations.

Instructional Activity
  1. Using “Curricular Materials and Classroom Resources Online” (that will be in an online format), participants explore those resources, specifically looking for one or more to incorporate into the unit/lesson they identified.
  2. In a blog entry on the class blog, they will be asked to describe each of the items listed in the rubric above.
  3. They must comment on the blog entries of at least 2 other classmates (number may be adjusted depending on number of enrollees).
  4. They must post a second entry of their own acknowledging input from their classmates and what they learned from their peers.

Assessment Rubric:

Not included=0
Only basic info=1
Complete Info=2
Brief description of unit to be revised/written & why



Name and author of resource to be incorporated



Where to locate resource (include link and description of location/host website)



Describe how it will be incorporated



Describe how it will improve student learning



Comment on 2 additional participants blog posts
0
2
4
Make a second post regarding what they learned from posts from classmates.
0
1
2
Maximum total points = 16


Resources:
“Curricular Materials and Classroom Resources Online”


Jen Duka's Lesson Plan

Duka
Lesson Plan: 2D

Objective: To get students to analyze and evaluate historical themes by posting comments on a blog

Materials: textbook The American People, class notes, class website and class blog

Procedure:
  1. Students will read about the causes of the American Revolution in their textbook for homework.
  2. Students will complete the worksheet for the causes of the American Revolution, which requires the students to examine the British and American rationale for the different events for homework.
  3. The class will discuss the causes of American Revolution and teacher will directly instruct.
  4. After the student has read and discussed the causes of the American Revolution, the students will be required to answer the blog question about the Revolution. On the blog the student must provide an answer and support the answer with at least 2 arguments.
    1. What do you feel was the most important event in causing the American Revolution?

Assessment:
Students will be given three points for posting a comment on the blog; one point for the event and one point for each of the arguments. The blog comment will help the student to develop quality historical paragraphs by requiring them to support their answer.

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